Design The Revolution

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A child free from the guilt of ownership and the burden of economic competition will grow up with the will to do what needs doing and the capacity for joy in doing it. It is useless work that darkens the heart. The delight of the nursing mother, of the scholar, of the successful hunter, of the good cook, of the skillful maker, of anyone doing needed work and doing it well—this durable joy is perhaps the deepest source of human affection, and of sociality as a whole.
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Dispossessed (via class-struggle-anarchism)

106 notes

According to a study by the St. Louis nonprofit Better Together, Ferguson receives nearly one-quarter of its revenue from court fees; for some surrounding towns it approaches 50 percent. Municipal reliance on revenue generated from traffic stops adds pressure to make more of them. One town, Sycamore Hills, has stationed a radar-gun-wielding police officer on its 250-foot northbound stretch of Interstate.

With primarily white police forces that rely disproportionately on traffic citation revenue, blacks are pulled over, cited and arrested in numbers far exceeding their population share, according to a recent report from Missouri’s attorney general. In Ferguson last year, 86 percent of stops, 92 percent of searches and 93 percent of arrests were of black people—despite the fact that police officers were far less likely to find contraband on black drivers (22 percent versus 34 percent of whites). This worsens inequality, as struggling blacks do more to fund local government than relatively affluent whites.
The Atlantic: The Racist Housing Policies That Built Ferguson (via kileyrae)

(via checkprivilege)

8 notes

By design, secrecy shrouds the hydrofracking process, casting a shadow that extends over consumers’ right to know if their food is safe. Federal loopholes crafted under former Vice President Dick Cheney have exempted energy companies from key provisions of the Clean Air, Clean Water and Safe Drinking Water Acts, the Toxics Release Inventory, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act, which requires a full review of actions that may cause significant environmental impacts. If scientists and citizens can’t find out precisely what is in drilling or fracking fluids or air emissions at any given time, it’s difficult to test whether any contaminants have migrated into the water, soil or food—and whether they can harm humans. It gets even more complicated: without information on the interactions between these chemicals and others already existing in the environment, an animal’s cause of death, Bamberger says, “is anyone’s guess.”
(via navigatethestream)

(Source: thenation.com, via navigatethestream)

20,273 notes

mizulily:

Hi guys, I felt like I should really share this experience with you. Recently I decided to conduct something of a…social experiment.

The first photo is of me in casual wear. It’s pretty mismatched. I was wearing my pajama top over my tee and had black pants on. My hairs messed up and everything. I look unprofessional, and it’s intended.

I took a walk through an inner city neighbourhood of Brisbane. I asked the police for directions to the library. I bought a krispy kreme doughnut from the 7 11. I went inside the mall and was asked to try free samples several times. I bought the first volume from SnK from Angus and Robert’s. I wasn’t treated any differently, the reactions were warm and friendly. My outfit didn’t effect anything at all.

The second image is me in a salwaar. The hair took effort to get into curls. (Sorry, the mirror was foggy) I had a bit of make up on. I looked good. The outfit was ironed and it looked much better than the previous one. I went to the same shops an hour later. Asked the same guard where the library was. Bought another krispy kreme.

The reactions were totally different. There were no thank you’s. No one asked me to try a sample. The guard was annoyed. When I went into the bookstore the lady at the register followed me around the whole time. When I bought a copy of ‘The storyteller’ by Jodi Picoult, she asked me if I had enough money with me before she scanned it.

I am a fourteen year old girl who has lived overseas for three years. Never have I faced such blatant discrimination.

What is this supposed to mean? You’re good to go as long as you don’t embrace your traditional values? Is this why south Asian girls are embarrassed to wear their saris and salwaars in the open? Is this why we refuse to wear our bindi and play the harmonium? Is this why we think it’s better to be well spoken in English that Bangla, Urdu, or Hindi.

When white people embrace my traditional values, they’re open minded. When I do it, I’m suddenly a nuisance. I’m automatically expected to not be well spoken. I’m automatically a suspect for shop lifting.

Think about that.

(via the-hairy-heterophobe)

1,271 notes

questionall:

Bolivia has reduced poverty and inequality more than any country in the Western Hemisphere over the last ten years by increasing the minimum wage 87%, doubling investment in schools and healthcare, and lowering the pension retirement age from 65 to 60. The government paid for these programs by increasing taxes on oil profits from 18% to 82%, which also allowed the country to eliminate its debt and amass the world’s largest surplus. Bolivia is now estimated to have the region’s fastest growing economy this year and next, according to the IMF. Share if we should follow Bolivia, Like our page US Uncut! Sources: http://bit.ly/11jrsOg http://bit.ly/1tuWVJH

questionall:

Bolivia has reduced poverty and inequality more than any country in the Western Hemisphere over the last ten years by increasing the minimum wage 87%, doubling investment in schools and healthcare, and lowering the pension retirement age from 65 to 60. The government paid for these programs by increasing taxes on oil profits from 18% to 82%, which also allowed the country to eliminate its debt and amass the world’s largest surplus. Bolivia is now estimated to have the region’s fastest growing economy this year and next, according to the IMF. Share if we should follow Bolivia, Like our page US Uncut! Sources: http://bit.ly/11jrsOg http://bit.ly/1tuWVJH

(via michaellangford)

8,950 notes

rubyknits:

america-wakiewakie:

Terrebonne deputy shoots, kills 14-year-old | WWLTV
Louisiana State Police are investigating a fatal shooting involving a 14-year-old boy and a Terrebonne Parish deputy Tuesday night in Houma.
The incident happened in Kirkglen Loop after deputies were called to the scene just before 6 p.m.
Louisiana State Police Trooper Evan Harrell said the initial report said several armed suspects ran into a home.
Harrell said what happened exactly is under investigation, but state police can confirm that the 14-year-old was fatally shot. He said a weapon was was recovered “in close proximity” to the 14-year-old’s body.
There are three other suspects in custody — two juveniles and an 18-year-old, Harrell said. A fifth suspect escaped out the rear of the residence. Harrell said the home was abandoned at the time.
Relatives on the scene identified the 14-year-old as Cameron Tillman, whose picture you can see above. They say he was shot four or five times in the back, and that he was a student at Ellender High School.
"The individual that was fatally wounded, his family, everybody deserves a proper investigation, and that’s what we’re here to do," Harrell said. "And until we get everything nailed down, squared away, we’ll be out here as long as it takes."
The investigation is ongoing.

Also from the article linked above:
Andre Tillman, Cameron’s brother, was inside the abandoned house at the time of the shooting. He said somebody knocked on the door. “My little brother thought somebody was just clowning, because somebody is always clowning by the door. He opened (it) and the man just shot him. He didn’t have nothing in his hand.”

rubyknits:

america-wakiewakie:

Terrebonne deputy shoots, kills 14-year-old | WWLTV

Louisiana State Police are investigating a fatal shooting involving a 14-year-old boy and a Terrebonne Parish deputy Tuesday night in Houma.

The incident happened in Kirkglen Loop after deputies were called to the scene just before 6 p.m.

Louisiana State Police Trooper Evan Harrell said the initial report said several armed suspects ran into a home.

Harrell said what happened exactly is under investigation, but state police can confirm that the 14-year-old was fatally shot. He said a weapon was was recovered “in close proximity” to the 14-year-old’s body.

There are three other suspects in custody — two juveniles and an 18-year-old, Harrell said. A fifth suspect escaped out the rear of the residence. Harrell said the home was abandoned at the time.

Relatives on the scene identified the 14-year-old as Cameron Tillman, whose picture you can see above. They say he was shot four or five times in the back, and that he was a student at Ellender High School.

"The individual that was fatally wounded, his family, everybody deserves a proper investigation, and that’s what we’re here to do," Harrell said. "And until we get everything nailed down, squared away, we’ll be out here as long as it takes."

The investigation is ongoing.

Also from the article linked above:

Andre Tillman, Cameron’s brother, was inside the abandoned house at the time of the shooting. He said somebody knocked on the door. “My little brother thought somebody was just clowning, because somebody is always clowning by the door. He opened (it) and the man just shot him. He didn’t have nothing in his hand.”

(via sinidentidades)